How I

Became

A Runner

When I was in Junior High School I wanted to go out for a sport but, being very thin, football did not look like the way to go. And I was not tall or much of a jumper, so basketball also was out. I was fast and liked the aggressiveness of soccor, but the school had no soccor team. So I ended up joining the cross-country team. During the summer, we would go up into the hills and run the fire trails, and that was more fun for me than baseball (boring).




Mid-Life

Running

Non-Crisis

During most of my professional career, I remained a runner. I would take my running shoes, shorts, and hand weights when I traveled and get to know the town I was in by going out early in the morning and running different directions every day. It kept me in shape for those long (boring) meetings and longer airline flights.




Running
Into
Old Age

As I have gotten older, running has been more of a challenge. I still like to get out and run, but have more aches and pains than when I was younger. And after an illness or other event that interrupts my training schedule, it gets harder and harder to get back up to the distances I ran in the past. I occasionally catch myself wondering how many more years can I get away with doing this?